Long Island, NY's Gone Stereo Share New Two Song Digital Single - Out Now!

Marks First Release on Newly Relaunched Negative Progression Records


Stream Side A ( “Don’t Think I Forgot About You”) Early on New Noise

Stream Side B ("Taste of This") Early on Punknews

Long Island, NY has a long and storied history as a hub of underground punk, and with their debut 2-track single, GONE STEREO, has added the first page to their chapter.


Recorded and mastered by John Naclerio at Nada Studios, and mixed by Sam Guaiana (Silverstein), "Don't Think I Forgot About You" is an early 2000s pop-punk flashback reminiscent of MxPx, Autopilot Off, The Ataris, or Allister to name a few. Catchy hooks, driving melodies and memorable choruses make it impossible to not sing-a-long and listen on repeat.

Of the lead single, vocalist Matty Lupinacci says, "Back in 2010, I was going through some trying times including a bad break up. Recently, I found a dusty old notebook while going through my garage and I took what was on those pages to create the lyrics for 'Don’t Think I Forgot About You.'


Stream “Don’t Think I Forgot About You” early on New Noise Magazine


B-side “Taste of This” has a pounding mid-tempo beat and soaring harmonies perfect for blasting the stereo with the windows down on a drive into the city for the pop-punk show.

Guitarist Chris Lynam adds, "When I first started talking to Matty about playing music together, he sent me some demos and immediately upon hearing 'Taste of This,' a huge smile was painted across my face. The riff, the subject matter, the melodies were all right in the wheelhouse of the music that I've loved since I was 13. I am really stoked on that song!"


Stream "Taste of This" early on Punknews

Pre-save here: https://orcd.co/dontthinkiforgotaboutyou


While the single serves as an introduction to Gone Stereo, it also heralds the official relaunch of beloved punk/emo/indie label Negative Progression Records.


Over the course of 17 years, NPR became known for discovering, developing, and supporting young bands, taking them out of the garage, and helping them hit the road.


The label (which went on to sell over 100,000 records, host a stage on the 2003 Vans Warped Tour, and release 30 titles) became a trusted curator in the underground punk scene, bringing to the world a number of albums now regarded as classics. Now, after a 9-year stint where label founder Seth Hyman focused exclusively on his career as an attorney, NPR is back not to relive the past, but to stay true to its original mission and find your next favorite band.


Of the label relaunch, Hyman says, "I started Negative Progression Records back in 1996 to help introduce the bands that I loved to the world. I started from scratch with no funding and just put everything I made back into promoting new bands. NPR was lucky to work with amazing musicians over the years and I'm looking forward to helping a new generation of emo-punk kids let it all out at the show."

Gone Stereo Socials:

https://www.instagram.com/gonestereo/

https://www.facebook.com/Gonestereoliny


Negative Progression Socials:

https://www.instagram.com/negativeprogression/

https://www.facebook.com/negativeprogression/

https://negativeprogressionrecords.bandcamp.com/

https://www.youtube.com/user/NPRTV